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On Abstraction: Window and Color in Twentieth-Century Art

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Poster:Post date:2013-11-30
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On Abstraction: Window and Color in Twentieth-Century Art

 On Abstraction: Window and Color in Twentieth-Century Art

On the Author: Born in 1928, Hubert Damisch is a French philosopher specialized in aesthetics and art history. In 1953, he graduated from the Sorbonne, and from 1975 to 1996, he taught at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris, France.  There he founded the Center of Art History and Theory (Centre d'histoire et théorie des arts (CEHTA)), and remained the Center Director until his retirement. 
Professor Damisch’s foundation lies in post-structuralism, with ties to psychoanalytic theories of Freud and Lacan as well as phenomenological theories of Merleau-Ponty. His writings cover a breath of subjects from the Renaissance to Contemporary Art, and encompass art from various mediums including painting, architecture, photography, cinematography and theater. His more significant writings include Théorie du nuage (1972), L'Origine de la perspective (1987), Le Jugement de Pâris (1992), and Skyline (1996). These works established Professor Damisch’s position in historical circles as one of the leading scholars in his field. In recent years, he has undertaken projects centered on photography and cinematography culminating in works such as La Dénivelée (2001) and Ciné fil (2008), both attest to his critique of art and art history as well as his continuing endeavor to analyze visual culture, and the respect it has earned in him academic circles.

Last modification time:2014-05-27 PM 5:26

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